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Archives Tagged projcomm12

Week #6: Monitoring & Evaluation

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In order to start getting some feedback we must have an access to our target group and people who participated in the project (and hopefully is still participaing). We assume that you have made nice long standing connections which I mentioned in previous blogs and then you must have communicated about whole process in all the way. So the good start is half the job. This will make half of your questions easier to answer, because people who you work with must be passionate about the theme.

Another very important part is get good feedback from your teammates and yourselves as well. It may sound strange, but we sometimes can’t really notice the whole process as a whole. It may take some time just to obtain a ‘fresh eyes’ and in that part I suggest communicating within your team briefly. You may found some things which you didn’t like along the path and even may want to fix some of your design (we all know that design is being polished ten thousand times till its ‘good enough’) as clear mind provides with some insight in your own work. Anyway don’t haste and do careless fixes because you may cause may damage than good. That’s why your teams here for.

If you can do it, share your research and insights with your target group and research connections. The best way to do it of course to gather for a last meeting to see really how people feel like about the whole process. That should give you more ideas about your design and you may (yes, again!) redesign it!

For nice feedbacking and talking methods on various socal themes google “Compass”. Issued for NGO’s from NGO’s.

Happy feedbacking

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Posted in All Students, Group 9, Marketing Products
This was originally published at strange Behaviour

Week #4: Dat Tech Guy

Today’s world have this very fast growth speed of technology. Doesn’t matter which direction you will look at, games industry or software, you will see that new versions, fixes and updates of platforms which we use are reaching us more frequently than ever. And I will tell you a fact, not a secret, phase will keep rising up.

Me personally have some software I like, but that mostly depends on how much I’ve worked with it, so whenever there’s is a need of using a different one I don’t get frustrated too much. I just do it.

Of course if you’re working on the team there may be more strict choices made by people who don’t like changing their working environment so much. Well if there is a situation that with certain people a compromise just can’t be reached then at first I wouldn’t like to work with these kind a people. They may be left in management field, but in a design process it would be extremely painful for me to work with them. Although I could, because I am flexible. Anyway, I believe these kind a people rarely get to a creative process so I believe there’s always a room for a group agreement. If still a person has a ‘crush’ on his software of choice then a group just should assign a whole task to that man and hope that he gets it right. Of course feedback and corrections afterwards are a must.

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I was a quite sometimes ‘dat tech guy’ in the group who held the responsibility to gather all the knowledge in digital so we could share it easier within and outside the group. Of course I have preferences like using ‘skype’ for a messenger, but people from different background use different messengers and sometimes skype is the rare one in the group so you got to adjust and find a sweet spot for the group communication. So you take a look for other preferences and even sometimes adjust your own as soon as you find something relevant for yourself. That’s innovation, but just in your tools for working with software. I always try to find better newer software, because some of it becomes outdated and then being overtaken by more advanced technology. In other words to say to be competitive you have to follow trends all the time. Doesn’t it apply for most of today’s competiveness in our world?

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Posted in All Students, Group 9, Marketing Products
This was originally published at strange Behaviour

My design principles for online communities or networks

What are your design principles for designing and fostering online communities or networks based on your experience in this course and your project? Please describe them and a little bit about how you have developed them.

I am sure that if I start thinking deeply about my design principles for designing and fostering online communities or networks, I can end up with a very — very — long list of principles. Because I don’t want to end up doing that, and I simply don’t have the time for that, I decided to highlight the 4 that I think are the most important:

1. Provide less, get more.

In my experience this is what applies to most of the platforms that I have used in my life — and enjoyed the most. It’s usually the networks that offer the least in terms of functionality that users feel the biggest amount of ownership during use. Think of Twitter for example. Its creators didn’t invent the @-reply and neither did they invent the Retweet. They were both inventions by the community, which had to come up with solutions to problems the very minimal system initially provided. The users feel a great sense of ownership (which is very much apparent now that Twitter is slowly killing parts of its ecosystem). Now, what would happen if Twitter already had all those features built-in from the start? Would it be an equal success? It’s guessing, but I think it wouldn’t be such a success.

I think that if you provide less, you are also fuelling creativity in the community of users. That’s a good thing as well, right? Especially if you want to put them in the mood of coming up with creative ideas for innovation.

2. Go mobile.

Slowly we’re moving to a world where mobile comes first. People mostly consume information through mobile devices (phones, tablets, whatever else there is to come in the future). Thinking of the incredible growth mobile phone usage is making in the developing world, this is the only way to go forward if we want to connect everybody and everything with everybody and everything in this world.

When was the last time you joined an online community that doesn’t have a dedicated app or (damn good) mobile interface? I don’t remember. Has to be a long time ago.

3. Don’t replicate functionality.

There is so much stuff online already, that there really is no reason to try to reinvent the wheel. Make use of what’s out there already. A couple of years ago the web was very segregated, but we’re going to a situation where more and more is connected with everything. The most-powerful platforms we’re using right now are the ones with an extensive ecosystem of apps and other ‘things’ that are connected to it through APIs. That’s what’s going to keep increasing. Eventually the password-input when logging in will be (nearly) entirely replaced by a ‘Log in with Facebook’ button. Those services are going to be so ubiquitous there is no reason not to take advantage of them.

And of course: there are too obvious design principles as well, like the need to focus on user interaction, but as I said I decided to leave them out.

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Posted in All Students, Group 1, Idea Networks
This was originally published at Bart Hoekstra's Tumbleblog

week 7 delayed

First of all I want to apologize for being so late with this blog post, with being sick I didn’t feel up for it and now I have been putting it off for far too long, as I do, quite often. Its really one of my personality flaws. But okay enough of this apologizing, we’ve got opinions to share and feedback to receive so let’s get cracking..!

This weeks reflection is about: If you had a design challenge, would you join and participate in one of the types of online communities we’ve been researching? Why or why not?


If I had a design challenge would I join one of the communities I have been researching… It depends really. Its depends on the type of design challenge, whether I believe I have a great idea that needs more working out then I would consider using a website such as quirky. However I must say that for me the barrier of having to pay money to join the community really is too high for me. If I would like to develop the idea further (with the help of other people) I would like to ask the help of designer friends (I am lucky that I have quite a few).

When I have an idea that is (I believe) fully developed, to a stage where I am ready for production, then I might give myself a chance to try out indiegogo or kickstarter. However I do feel I would hesitate to do so. Just because those websites are so saturated with good ideas that I would be scared my good idea would get lost in the big pile.

I would for sure use my social network to try and get other people to promote my idea as hard as I am promoting it. But the basis would then probably still be in indiegogo.

Its hard to say, I have never had an idea I believed in that much I have wanted to develop it so I can’t really say.

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Posted in All Students, Group 7, Support Raising
This was originally published at Investi-gator Laura

Design principles for online communities

First of all we need to think about the user’s needs, because he is the most important client for the whole project like this. So it must be very user friendly, which every company usually knows nowadays but not everyone can permute that. In my opinion user friendly means always simple and clear which is very important in web design as I hate web pages that you open and you basically get overfilled with thousands of information so for instance you don’t know if you can order the nice feet massage machine from the first page or if the just expect you to donate for this product.
Here we are already coming to the next important issue the age of the user what means that the whole design must be orientated on the target group we are searching for.

For a fund raising page like Indiegogo.com where we were working with it is more than necessary to think about a design which should nearly appeal to every age as they need as much people as possible to get into the funding community. I just imagine my father read an article about for example ‘Kickstarter’ - the new way of donating and supporting ideas and he may gets interested by an article about the new feet massage machine which needs some funding. Then he may opens the web page and just want to get more information about this product but in fact he can’t find it during a few minutes he will definitely quit and swear the next time he sees me about technology. In conclusion we need a simple overview on the first window where you can choose different categories. I believe that Indiegogo found a nice design for this as you can select between the three main actions ‘browse’, ‘learn’ and ‘create’. For the last point ‘create’ I would try to give the community as much freedom as possible so if someone wants to create there a whole blog about his product or project he should be able doing that. Same for the comment function where I would like to give the freedom to the users to comment on everything of the presented projects/products or even the whole page for suggestions.

All in all I would design a page based on those issues with the main priority of user-friendliness and the goal of getting a huge community to fund.

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Posted in All Students, Group 7, Support Raising
This was originally published at FreshFresher

Personal Blog Reflection Prompt #7

This week’s reflection question is simple. If you had a design challenge, would you join and participate in one of the types of online communities we’ve been researching? Why or why not?

If I had a design challenge I am surely going to use (and have so in the past) at least some of the platforms we’ve been researching. Depending on the kind of activities that I want to undertake I will choose an online community to use.

The easiest thing to do is something that I nearly always do and that is asking for input to my Twitter followers. They’re an amazing group of people from very diverse backgrounds, and usually I end up with useful information. Sometimes that’s a completely new insight, sometimes it’s only something that reassures whether I am on the right or wrong path, but it’s always useful.

More difficult things to do is the usage of real idea networks. This requires a lot more planning and time to put into facilitation and thus is something that I would only do if both of those things are within the projects’ constraints.

Other platforms, like Basecamp (for workteams), are already such a standard in my workflow that I am not even thinking of excluding them in my design processes.

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Posted in All Students, Group 1, Idea Networks
This was originally published at Bart Hoekstra's Tumbleblog

Design Challenge & Funding Platforms

If there would be a design challenge I would definitely use one of the online communities that we were researching on. In our case we were researching indiegogo.com which is a very good page to fund money for a project like this but I personally would prefer using kickstarter.com just because of the fact that there is bigger community which means there are simply more people who could see and fund my project.

I think it is a very good thing that you can find investors for a simple idea just on the internet these days. Moreover there is nothing that I could lose so for me there is nothing against the idea of using those online communities. Furthermore the advantages are very useful for instance you can have a free market research by starting a project on a funding platform as if there are thousands of people who are funding my project I could be nearly sure that it is something what people were waiting for.

All in all if I would have a finished idea, which only needs some money to get started I would definitely participate in one of these online communities to make my idea reality.

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Posted in All Students, Group 7, Support Raising
This was originally published at FreshFresher

week 6

Reflect on your contribution to your team’s project.

I think the best way that I have been contributing to our team’s work is that I am always there with the team meeting. I react to team discussions quickly and am always quick to ask questions that stimulate discussions. I am also lucky that I can type quickly and can write my thoughts down in understandable English. That makes me an asset in the meeting words meetings.

How would you monitor and evaluate your own learnings so far?

I would monitor my learning by looking back at the blogsposts and comparing them to the other blogs of the people in class, in that way we I can see if I am on the same track with the others. I also ask for feedback from Shahab. If I am doing a bad job I would hope he would tell me to make more of an effort in the lacking departments.

The learnings of your team? The whole class?

Again in this part it would be good to monitor the blogs and see the personal development. For the team work its also great to look at the team findings in the different kinds of platforms so to see all the information that has been gathered. 

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Posted in All Students, Group 7, Support Raising
This was originally published at Investi-gator Laura

What did we learn so far?

Now we are already in week 6 of our projectcommunity and when I look back I think I contributed at least a satisfactory amount as I am always participating the class as long as I am not on a wedding of a friend like last week. Even then I felt I need to contribute something afterwards so as I came back from the wedding I directly checked our facebook group where I could see that our team leader Tsvetelina is searching for some volunteers and I in a situation like this I feel responsible for doing something for my team so I promptly said I will do it. Further some weeks ago we had to present our teamwork in a two minutes presentation to the class and our teamleader was mainly preparing the powerpoint so I said I can present at least a part, which I finally did with Laura.

I believe our team work is going well so far because when there is a lot to do we split the work and an example for that was at the beginning of this work where we divided the tasks and finally I was doing a research on FirstGiving.com and summarized it in a wordfile. So we always get the things done so far in our group and right now we are all working on some ideas how our final presentation cloud look like.

Moreover I would evaluate my learnings as good so far because when someone is asking me about what we are doing here in this course I keep on responding that we are doing a research on Fundraising online network platforms, which I were never looking up before actually so for me it is really interesting to see how easy it can be – the way from the idea to the final product or the place where it is needed. Because of that I already started thinking a lot about starting something on one of those platforms like Kickstart.com but at the moment it is not finished ;)

I would put the learnings of my team or the whole class together as I can’t say exactly what the others are learning new for themselves but I think the weekly blogposts of everyone are giving a nice insight about what each student is learning in this course. 

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Posted in All Students, Group 7, Support Raising
This was originally published at FreshFresher

Learning so far

So far we’ve all been through kind of a confusing group process. Sometimes we think we’re clear about what to do, often times we’re not entirely. That results in us changing directions or opinions and views on what to do all the time. When we started off I was pretty sure about what we should do, but that feeling of knowing what to do sometimes makes place for the opposite and it goes on like that all the time.

My personal contribution so far to the project has mainly been that I try to come up with things that we can do. Since I so far have — I think — the best general understanding of the platforms we’re researching, I try to keep that clear in the minds of my teammates. That’s my main role I think. In the upcoming weeks my role will shift more to (meticulously) stitching the final product together.

Monitoring the learnings so far is kind of a tricky thing to do. I think if we really wanted to monitor that, we should actually be doing the things we propose in our final presentations. We should try using OpenIDEO once for our own projects. Or if we are in a group working on funding, we should try funding some of our projects. Depending on the results of those acts we can assess the knowledge and skills that we have gained.

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Posted in All Students, Group 1, Idea Networks
This was originally published at Bart Hoekstra's Tumbleblog