NOTE: This is a full archive for the Project Community: You & The World (2012) please see the main site for the most up to date information.

Archives For Group 5

designcloud: House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office Asik,…





designcloud:

House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office

Asik, simpel

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Ayesha Nabila

designcloud: House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office Asik,…





designcloud:

House in Fukawa by Suppose Design Office

Asik, simpel

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Ayesha Nabila

For a good start of the week ;)



For a good start of the week ;)

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Deyan Kolev

thedsgnblog: Davide Anzalone   |  …





thedsgnblog:

Davide Anzalone   |   http://davideanzalone.com

“From coffee table to vase-holder, from display unit to a chest of drawers: a neutral rectangular box has in its interior a coloured base structure, fitted out with shelves, uprights or drawers, depending on its function. The design is characterized by the formal and functional contrast between the interior and the exterior of the piece of furniture. In cooperation with Tommaso Bistacchi.”

Davide Anzalone (Porto Recanati 1980), after graduating at the Politecnico di Milano, moves to Austria and gets a specialization in Product Design at the FH Joanneum of Graz. In 2006 he goes back to Italy and, after a short period in Design Group Italia, begins his freelance activity collaborating with various architecture studios and consumer electronics firms. Since 2007 he is Chief of Design Department of the Hertz and Audison brands. At the same time he is also working as a design consultant for concept and innovation design studios. In 2009 establishes Anzalone+Bistacchi design studio with Tommaso Bistacchi.

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Kewl!

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Ayesha Nabila

: Shop Hunting Tuesdays: Pulp Shop

: Shop Hunting Tuesdays: Pulp Shop:

thedsgnblog:

Pulp | http://pulp-shop.com

The PULP brand was created as a result of a collaboration between two families – Covo and Federbusch – who share a longstanding passion for paper products. Each family owns and operates a family business going back some 100 years and spanning over four…

This is inspiring

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Ayesha Nabila

[OUT SOON] Artist: Adele Title: Skyfall (Marvic Remix) Buy…



[OUT SOON]

Artist: Adele
Title: Skyfall (Marvic Remix)

Buy Original: http://bit.ly/SX2N7k

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Deyan Kolev

Test Nr.1 #Prompt8

Since I have been part of this course I have learned a lot about online communities but till now not so much about design and I think that my judgment on this might not be so good.
But what the hell, I’ll give it a try.

I think the most important part to keep in mind during the development and design of a online community is diversity.
I think that if a online community make’s it easier for everyone to use it keeping the principles of cultural diversity in mind and adapting them depending on the country or continent that they operate. Maybe even divided sections for different countries.
If you think about it it’s like the binary language, it’s full of zeros and ones and they are exactly the same like one and other but when they get translated from the browser it does depend on the language you chose on your browser. So if there would be a way to find a common system that is effective and fast and also have the tools for everyone in order so they can translate the common system to something more understandable in their culture, I think that would be a almost perfect system. So I think I would go with this principle, generality.

As for fostering an online community I think that I would do polls and ask for random reports from random users, ask them what do they like and dislike from the community and try and compare the results so improvements can be done in a efficient way.

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Johan Bagkoutsa

#Prompt8

  • What are your design principles for designing and fostering online communities or networks based on your experience in this course and your project? Please describe them and a little bit about how you have developed them
   
          This course and this project have been interesting. I have found a couple of things about online communities and networks that surprised me and some facts that i already knew about. The structure of an online community is usually really simple so that users can figure out where to look for information and other things without having to consult a manual or anything else. The categories that are part of this structure are usually self explanatory.

          Nowadays, the internet let’s you find online communities that basically serve any interest you might have or help you get feedback, sell, buy and many more facilities. It is impossible for an online community to serve all these functions but Facebook tries to do so, which is a reason why it is so well spread. It has also helped our group communicate, share information and documents.

          Our research has helped us understand a bit more how users tend to use these online communities and a couple of things that they would be interested in. I personally found out that to better understand how a online community works you should research the interaction between large groups of people using the community and not between groups of 2 people, regardless of the number of groups. Some design principles that should define an online community are: ease of use, access to the whole community, simple design, third party applications, ease of sharing files and information and small original functions that attract users in the community (such as location sharing).

         It has been an interesting journey and looking forward for more!
Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at THE Blog

Social networks 



Social networks 

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Deyan Kolev

Personal Blog Reflection Prompt #8:

Here we go in week eight of project community course. After this 8 weeks I learned a lot and have a enough experience in using and talking about online communities. The research we made with my group was about the Indonesia Mengajar  ( an Indonesian NGO) which main purpose is to reach the uneducated children in the rural areas.

And when we should talk about design principles I found 10 really important principles in design doesn’t matter for what kind of work we are going to use them.  The following:

  1. Start with needs
  2. Do less
  3. Design with data
  4. Do the hard work to make it simple
  5. Iterate. Then iterate again.
  6. Build for inclusion
  7. Understand context
  8. Build digital services, not websites
  9. Be consistent, not uniform
  10. Make things open: it makes things better

  The design process must start with identifying and thinking about real user needs. We should design around those — not around the way the ‘official process’ is at the moment. We must understand those needs thoroughly — interrogating data, not just making assumptions — and we should remember that what users ask for is not always what they need. If you research about our NGO you can see how they work with the same structure or with most of the steps.

Something really important when you want to reach a huge amount of people is to make it simple and working.  Making something look simple is easy; making something simple to use is much harder — especially when the underlying systems are complex — but that’s what we should be doing. This part is the key to the success. When we have simple and easy to use design people have easy access and they can spend more time on it. Accessible design is good design. We should build a product that’s as inclusive, legible and readable as possible. If we have to sacrifice elegance — so be it. We shouldn’t be afraid of the obvious, shouldn’t try to reinvent web design conventions and should set expectations clearly. We’re not designing for a screen, we’re designing for people. We need to think hard about the context in which they’re using our services. Are they in a library? Are they on a phone? Are they only really familiar with Facebook? Have they never used the web before?

We’re designing for a very diverse group of users with very different technologies and needs. We need to make sure we’ve understood the technological and practical circumstances in which our services are used. Otherwise we risk designing beautiful services that aren’t relevant to people’s lives.

Posted in All Students, Customer Communities, Group 5
This was originally published at Deyan Kolev